MedPage Today: OncoBreak: Better Mammography; Fuel for Cancer Cells; Patients Need More Info

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Use of breast tomosynthesis with digital mammography significantly reduced the number of women recalled for additional tests. (RSNARadiology)

The College of American Pathologists and American Society of Hematology issued new guideline for the initial workup of patients with acute leukemia.

The FDA granted breakthrough therapy status to the immunotherapy combination Toca 511 and Toca FC for recurrent high-grade glioma, said manufacturer Tocagen.

More evidence that a genomic assay may help identify women with early breast cancer who can safely avoid chemotherapy. (MD Anderson Cancer Center)

Most patients who undergo elective bowel surgery receive inadequate bowel preparation to avoid postoperative complications. (Fox Chase Cancer Center)

In studies involving mice, researchers successfully reversed prostate cancer cells' resistance to the widely used hormonal therapy enzalutamide (Xtandi). (Cleveland Clinic)

Changes in glucose metabolism occurred in association with the development of genetic alterations that increased the aggressiveness of cancer cells, providing a "whole new sandbox" for testing new strategies to treat cancer. (UCLA)

Laboratory studies may have identified the mechanism that allows prostate cancer cells to hoard cholesterol and possibly fuel cancer cell growth. (Duke Cancer Institute)

Better treatment of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease could follow the publication of the first-ever guidelines for diagnosis of the rare autoimmune blood disorder. (Penn Medicine)

A newly available skin monitoring app can help people track and monitor changes in moles that may represent early signs of skin cancer. (CompariSkin)

A survey of cancer patients and caregivers showed that more than two-thirds lacked information about cancer tests and treatments to help them make informed decisions about cancer care. (Cancer Treatment Centers of America)

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